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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

expectations

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a product is viewed as being priced substantially higher than what was expected. The product examined by Urbany and colleagues (1997) was an apartment.

This scale measures how dependable a customer views a service provider to be based upon the quality of its most visible attributes. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of tangible assets compared with the desired  level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

This scale measures how dependable a person thinks a company is in providing a service. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of reliability compared with the desired service level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person evaluates the tangible aspects of an object such as a structure to be of high quality.  The object examined by Wakefield and Barnes (1996) was a stadium.

Four open-ended questions are used to measure a consumer's beliefs regarding various aspects of a product's price.

A person's belief that "the world" owes him or her something is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type statements.

A four-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer's expectations regarding a museum and its services have been met.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to capture the expressed likelihood that someone will return to a place he or she has been (or is) already.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are purported to measure the extent to which a respondent thinks that a person who has received an injury using a product realized that such an unfortunate outcome was a possible consequence of using the product.

This is a two-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measuring a person's belief that inflation will continue and probably be worse.