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expectations

The scale is composed of five, seven-point items attempting to assess a consumer's expected level of satisfaction prior to some behavior such as buying a certain product. The implication is that the respondents have been exposed to some information by the time they respond to the measure (e.g., promotion, word-of-mouth) but they have not committed themselves in the form of a purchase yet.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a theater attendee's confidence in the quality and consistency of the shows produced by a specified theater. The scale was called trust by Garbarino and Johnson (1999).

The seven-point, three-item scale is meant to measure a consumer's expectation of the relative price level of products for sale at a specified vendor. As used by Jain and Srivastava (2000), respondents had not been to the store and only had the information provided in the experimental scenario. Thus, the scale would appear to be most relevant when a new store or online vendor has opened and the interest is in what consumers think about its price level based on what little they know about it from advertising, friends, et cetera.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a product is viewed as being priced substantially higher than what was expected. The product examined by Urbany and colleagues (1997) was an apartment.

This scale measures how dependable a customer views a service provider to be based upon the quality of its most visible attributes. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of tangible assets compared with the desired  level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

This scale measures how dependable a person thinks a company is in providing a service. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of reliability compared with the desired service level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person evaluates the tangible aspects of an object such as a structure to be of high quality.  The object examined by Wakefield and Barnes (1996) was a stadium.

Four open-ended questions are used to measure a consumer's beliefs regarding various aspects of a product's price.

A person's belief that "the world" owes him or her something is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type statements.

A four-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer's expectations regarding a museum and its services have been met.