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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

expectations

The scale is composed of five, six-point items that measure one’s expectation that if he/she were able to purchase a certain product then it would have a positive impact on one’s life in terms of confidence, status, and image.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the confidence in one’s ability to predict his/her future attitude toward some object.  To be clear, the scale measures a person’s certainty in his/her ability rather than the objective accuracy of the prediction.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings that are expressed in terms of optimism about the future.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes he/she will contract a certain health condition and is worried about it is measured with four, nine-point items.

The anticipated popularity of a new product and the interest among consumers in purchasing it is measured with three, seven-point questions.

The scale has three statements that measure the extent to which a person believes him/herself to be a valuable customer of retail establishment and, thereby, deserving of special treatment from the employees.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s general belief that the current day will be good rather than bad.

The degree to which a person believes his/her future is open with many opportunities is measured using ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

A customer’s belief that he/she deserved special treatment or reward from the retailer because of his/her purchase is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.