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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

expectations

How a customer believes an actual experience compares to what he/she expected it to be is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a shopper’s uncertainty that he/she will be able to choose a product from the assortment provided by a particular retailer that will meet his/her expectations.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided.

With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

The scale is composed of five, six-point items that measure one’s expectation that if he/she were able to purchase a certain product then it would have a positive impact on one’s life in terms of confidence, status, and image.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the confidence in one’s ability to predict his/her future attitude toward some object.  To be clear, the scale measures a person’s certainty in his/her ability rather than the objective accuracy of the prediction.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings that are expressed in terms of optimism about the future.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes he/she will contract a certain health condition and is worried about it is measured with four, nine-point items.

The anticipated popularity of a new product and the interest among consumers in purchasing it is measured with three, seven-point questions.

The scale has three statements that measure the extent to which a person believes him/herself to be a valuable customer of retail establishment and, thereby, deserving of special treatment from the employees.