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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

expectations

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s general belief that the current day will be good rather than bad.

The degree to which a person believes his/her future is open with many opportunities is measured using ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

A customer’s belief that he/she deserved special treatment or reward from the retailer because of his/her purchase is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a customer believes that he/she has earned special treatment from someone or some organization for an unspecified reason is measured with seven-point, Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person believes a particular advertisement is atypical and unexpected.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person's belief in being able to personally solve a problem that would otherwise require the company's help to fix.  The scale items seem to be amenable for use with a variety of problems a customer might experience, e.g., with self-service technology, with a product, with a website. 

How likely a person believes he/she will be threatened by a particular health condition sometime in the future is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

A consumer's expressed likelihood of going online to download a coupon for a product is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages. 

The degree to which a person believes that he/she will suffer physically if he/she has unhealthy eating patterns is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.