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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

experience

The degree to which a person believes a particular experience was peaceful and relaxing is measured with four, five-point items.

 

How much a person has had a particular experience is measured with four, five-point items.

Three, nine-point items measure the degree to which a person believes a particular experience was more than just enjoyable for the moment; it is viewed as having a larger impact on his/her life in terms of meaningfulness and fulfillment.

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure how much a person experienced something with other people rather than alone.

The degree to which a person believes a particular experience has helped make and/or define him-/herself is measured with three, five-point items.

The degree to which a consumer reports having a lot of knowledge and experience with so-called "green products" is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using six items, this scale measures how positively a person evaluates a particular experience he/she has had.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a sensory experience with a product from a category would provide him/her with a better understanding of the different types within the category.  To be clear, this scale focuses on the differences between product types across a category (breadth) rather than the similarity within one type of product (depth).

How much a person anticipates that his/her sensory experience with a product would familiarize him/her with the common aspects of products of that type is measured with three, nine-point items.  To be clear, this scale is intended to measure the similarity within one type of a product (the person's preferred type) rather than measuring the differences between types across a category.

The scale uses seven-point semantic-differentials to measure a consumer's opinion of his/her familiarity with and expertise in buying products within a certain category.