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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

experience

With four, seven-point items, this scale measures how fully a person understands a particular experience he/she has had in terms of why it was chosen and the reasons it was liked/disliked.

A person's opinion of his/her level of knowledge about vitamins and experience with taking them is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The level of knowledge and personal experience a person reports having with dieting is measured in this scale using ten items with a seven-point response format.

How familiar a person is with product sharing programs for a specific product category is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes him/herself to have knowledge and expertise about a topic compared to other people.  While the scale can be used with regard to a product category, the items are amenable for use with many other objects and subjects as well.

The degree to which a person relies on feeling and intuition to make decisions and judgments is measured using five items.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).

The degree to which a consumer believes that a particular brand has had a strong emotional impact on him/her is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular brand has had a strong effect on one or more of his/her senses.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that his/her use of a particular brand has evoked cognitive activity.