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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

experience

With four, seven-point items, this scale measures how fully a person understands a particular experience he/she has had in terms of why it was chosen and the reasons it was liked/disliked.

A person's opinion of his/her level of knowledge about vitamins and experience with taking them is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The level of knowledge and personal experience a person reports having with dieting is measured in this scale using ten items with a seven-point response format.

How familiar a person is with product sharing programs for a specific product category is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes him/herself to have knowledge and expertise about a topic compared to other people.  While the scale can be used with regard to a product category, the items are amenable for use with many other objects and subjects as well.

The degree to which a person relies on feeling and intuition to make decisions and judgments is measured using five items.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).

The degree to which a consumer believes that a particular brand has had a strong emotional impact on him/her is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular brand has had a strong effect on one or more of his/her senses.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that his/her use of a particular brand has evoked cognitive activity.