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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

expertise

The scale uses three statements to measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has expert level knowledge with respect to a specific product category and is an excellent source of information for friends buying such a product.

Four, seven-point items measure a person’s knowledge of and experience with a particular physical exercise.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how knowledgeable a person reports being with regard to jokes.  Although the scale measures self-reported awareness and recall of jokes, it does not explicitly measure if a person believes him/herself to be funny in telling the jokes.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

A person's belief that a company is competent at making products that will perform as expected is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure how much a person describes someone or something as being skilled and reliable.

The degree to which a consumer reports having a lot of knowledge and experience with so-called "green products" is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

The scale uses seven-point semantic-differentials to measure a consumer's opinion of his/her familiarity with and expertise in buying products within a certain category.

A person's opinion of his/her level of knowledge about vitamins and experience with taking them is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.