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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

facilities

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular location-based retailer where he/she receives a service has facilities that are high quality and easy to use.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes the physical environment of a store is high quality.

This four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital, and its rooms in particular, are appealing and clean.

This scale is a 21-item, seven-point Likert-type performance-based measure of service quality. It is viewed as a measure of a consumer's long-term global attitude of an organization rather than his/her transaction-specific satisfaction.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring an aspect of service quality focused on the degree to which a customer says the provider knows that certain physical aspects of the service are important to patrons and the respondent is pleased with them.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess an aspect of service quality having to do with the extent to which a customer believes the physical environment of a provider's facilities are notable and relevant. The scale was intended to tap into the visual aspects of a service provider's facilities (layout) rather than non-visual ones.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type statements to measure an aspect of service quality having to do with the extent to which a customer believes the physical environment of a provider's facilities is pleasant and important. Although not explicit in the statements, the scale was apparently intended to tap into non-visual aspects of a service provider's facilities (temperatures, smells, sounds) rather than visual aspects.

Eight scenarios with seven-point response scales are used to assess the way a consumer believes a specified health club would resolve potential service problems.

This scale measures how dependable a customer views a service provider to be based upon the quality of its most visible attributes. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of tangible assets compared with the desired  level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the material and human aspects of a service provider are visually appealing. As described here, the scale relates to the tangibles dimension of the SERVQUAL instrument (Parasuraman, Berry, and Zeithaml 1991; Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry 1988) but is not equivalent to it. Each dimension of the SERVQUAL measure is composed of the summated differences between expectation items and perceptual items, not just perceptual items as the scale described here is. Carman (1990) used several variations on the scale, as described subsequently. Taylor (1995) only used perceptual items.