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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

fairness

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.

The scale measures a consumer’s belief that if he/she was wronged in some way by a brand and/or some employees associated with it then the memories of the unfair behavior would be an obsession.  Six, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular company treats him/her unfairly.

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how much a customer believes he/she was treated fairly by a business and as deserved.

Three items are used to measure a person's belief that countries which are the recipients of jobs or other functions that have been moved from their original country (outsourced) are unfairly taking advantage of lower labor costs.

A customer's belief that it is the retailer's responsibility that a product had to be returned is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.

The degree to which a person believes there is a possibility that a certain unjust situation can be remedied is measured using three statements.

These ten, five-point Likert-type items are intended to measure the degree of value a consumer places on the offer extended to him/her by a former service provider in an effort to reacquire his/her business after having defected. The scale was called win-back offer worth (WOW) by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007).