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familiarity

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s enjoyment of trying unfamiliar experiences. Although three of the statements are general and do not indicate what is being experienced, two items mention products.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of knowledge a person has about the normal price level of a particular product category.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

Four, seven-point items measure a person’s knowledge of and experience with a particular physical exercise.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

The likelihood of experiencing five different types of risk consequences with respect to an unfamiliar brand in a certain product category is measured with five, seven-point items.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a sensory experience with a product from a category would provide him/her with a better understanding of the different types within the category.  To be clear, this scale focuses on the differences between product types across a category (breadth) rather than the similarity within one type of product (depth).