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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

family

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief regarding the degree to which the family had enough money to pay for food and housing when he/she was growing up.

The adequacy of help and emotional support one receives from others is measured in this seven-point Likert-type scale.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that are used to measure a person's intention to not only say nice things about a company to friends, family, and others but also to recommend they purchase its products.

One's lack of close relationships with family members and a romantic partner from whom support and encouragement can be received is measured with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a parent believes that he/she along with other parents should be open to children's opinions and encourage them to speak up.

How much a person values security for self and family is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the extent to which a person values one's culture, traditions, and family heritage.

The degree to which some information or object has evoked thoughts of self and family is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

This scale uses nine statements to measure the degree to which a person expresses a type of interdependent self-concept based on close relationships with specific others.

Five, five-point, Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a parent reports refusing to buy particular products for his/her child when the latter asks for them but does provide an explanation of why the requests are denied.