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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

fantasy

The extent to which a person is superstitious is measured based his/her belief in three phenomena that, if genuine, would violate basic limiting principles of science.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes the ads for products placed within video games makes the experience more realistic.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game but rather, refer to in-game advertising in general.

The construct measured by this scale has to do with the physical sensations a person felt during some experience, with the focus being on how ill and disoriented the person felt. The scale has four, seven-point items.

Eight, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure how much a person has a subjective experience of feeling immersed in a particular virtual environment while physically being in another context.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person becomes immersed in his/her mental imagery.

A person's ability to imagine how new product concepts could be developed in order to be more useful and relevant to consumers is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports fantasizing and having a vivid imagination.

The scale is composed of eleven, five-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure flow and/or peak experiences in a consumption context. (More description is provided in the Origin section.)

The scale is composed of eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person has the sense of being at/in (presence) a remote/virtual environment (tele). Thus, afterwards the person is left with a feeling of having been psychologically transported to a "world" created at a website such that for a time it was as if they were there rather than the physical place where the viewing was done (home, office).

This four-item, six-point Likert-type scale is supposed to measure the degree to which a person views a specified activity or experience as being novel and arousing curiosity. This scale was called arousal by Unger (1981; Unger and Kernan 1983) and the activity investigated was subjective leisure. In the study by Guiry, Mägi, and Lutz (2006) the activity was recreational shopping.