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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

fashion

The three-item, five-point scale measures the degree to which a person feels that engaging in one of two behaviors would be a signal of his/her status and superiority to others.

The degree to which something or someone is viewed as stylish and trendy is measured in this scale with three, nine-point, semantic differentials. 

Using four, seven-point items, this scale measures the extent to which a consumer finds gratification in shopping online because it facilitates learning about and adopting new products, particularly those that are fashion-related.  The scale was referred to as the avant-gardism motivation by Ganesh et al. (2010).

The degree to which a person believes that a brand's products are modern and visually appealing is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person views an object as being contemporary and stylish is measured in this scale with three, seven-point unipolar terms.

The various versions of this Likert-type scale are used to measure the importance of being in fashion, particularly with regard to dress. A four-item version was suggested by Wells and Tigert (1971) and apparently used by Darden and Perreault (1976). Two-and four-item versions were used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and Wilkes (1992), respectively. See also the scale used by Schnaars and Schiffman (1984).

The sixteen-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the intensity of the relationship that a viewer has with the characters and setting of a TV program and the extent to which it affects the viewer's self-identity.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer views a specified behavior to be consistent with his or her self-image in a specified situation. The similarity between a consumer's self-concept and the image held of the product/behavior is the focus of the measure. Two versions of the scale used three items and five-point response formats whereas another version used five items and a seven-point response scale.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type statements evaluate a person's willingness to do whatever it takes to be the center of attention.

Sixteen, seven-point Likert-type statements assess a person's concern about clothes as they affect his or her appearance. The scale measures the degree to which a respondent is willing to invest time, money, and effort into clothes and how they will look.