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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

fear

How positively or negatively a person feels about an object is measured with ten, five-point items.  Unlike many, if not most, measures of affect, the items in this scale are full sentences rather than semantic differentials.  The sentences are easily modified for a variety of objects.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s motivation to hide his/her socially-relevant mistakes and weaknesses.

The tendency to worry about what other people think of oneself is measured with 12, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of fear that has been evoked by some stimulus.

The degree to which a person reports feeling emotionally uncomfortable and upset is measured in this scale with three, five-point unipolar items.

Using six, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures the extent to which a person reports feeling attacked verbally in the sense of his/her image being maligned.

The degree to which a person experiences strong, negative affective responses to the expectation or occurrence of unpleasant events is measured with seven items.

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer is apprehensive of technology and avoids its usage. This construct is sometimes referred to by the more provocative term technophobia (e.g., Brosnan 1998; Rosen, Sears, and Weil 1987).

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person is uncomfortable using a particular piece of technology and avoids using it.