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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

features

The scale uses three statements to measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has expert level knowledge with respect to a specific product category and is an excellent source of information for friends buying such a product.

How cozy and cushiony a person judges a particular object to be is measured with three, nine-point semantic differentials.  Although “comfortable” can be thought of in emotional or social terms, this scale is most suited for use when rating physical objects, particularly ones that can be sat or laid on, e.g., chairs, sofas, beds.

The extent to which a person believes that an object weighs little is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How soft a person judges a particular seat to be is measured with three, nine-point items.  Given the phrasing of the items, the object should be something a person can sit on and has arms such as with a sofa, chair, or car seat.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is not pleased with the features he/she choose while customizing a product and would feel better if given the chance to change them.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels good about the way he/she customized a product for him/herself and would make the same decision again.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how important a product feature is to a consumer’s evaluation of a particular product and the decision about it.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes a particular product part is an integral feature of a product.  To be clear, the scale measures how much a component is considered to be a defining feature of the product rather than how important the component is to a consumer’s decision.

The scale measuresd the extent to which a person believes that a particular advertisement he/she has been exposed to focuses more on the benefits consumers could experience from the product rather than just the product’s characteristics apart from the benefits.  Three, seven-point items compose the scale.

How integral a particular product part is viewed as being to a product is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure how important a component is to a consumer’s decision but rather how much a component is considered to be a defining feature of the object.