You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

feedback

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer of a company believes that a particular employee of a company provides timely and regular information about how the customer’s suggestions and other involvement help to improve customer service.

With four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer provides feedback to a company about his/her experiences brand’s products in order to help improve them or have new ones created.  The implication in the sentences is that this behavior is ongoing rather than a one-time event.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert items to measure the degree to which the feedback provided by a customer to a service provider is meant to show concern for the future of their relationship.

With three, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer’s expressed probability of providing ideas and feedback to a particular business entity in the future.

A person's belief that expressing his/her opinion about a certain brand to others will enable comparisons with their experiences and feelings is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four statements are used in this scale to measure how a person feels about money he/she has received.  In the study by Raghubir and Srivastava (2009), the scale was used to measure how people felt about the compensation they received from a market research firm for participating in a study.  The scale seems to be amenable for use in a wider variety of contexts such as how consumers feel about product rebates, tax refunds, and legal settlements.

Six, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person believes a website allows a free flow of information from the user as well as to the user (two-way).

Three items compose the scale and measure a person's belief that a certain website has social elements, in particular, it indicates the site's charitable activities and enables posting of comments by customers about their experiences.