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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

financial

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief regarding the degree to which the family had enough money to pay for food and housing when he/she was growing up.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes he/she can stick to a budget, avoid spending when necessary, and accomplish financial goals.

A person’s confidence in his/her ability to accomplish financial goals is measured with seven Likert items.

The extent to which a person is described as having high social status and economic resources is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The scale has five, six-point items that measure how quickly and easily a person believes he/she could repay money taken from personal savings or charged to a credit card if it was used to pay for an emergency.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

A person’s belief that he/she has the necessary financial resources to not only pay bills but also feel relatively wealthy is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The seven-point Likert-type scale has three items that measure the degree to which a person believes there would be a negative impact on the achievement of his/her long-term goals if money was drawn from savings that was set aside.

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

Multiple versions of a seven-point Likert-type scale measure the degree to which a person believes he/she would feel guilty and irresponsible about withdrawing money from savings that was set aside for some purpose.