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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

financial

The extent to which a consumer has focused on constraining his/her spending in a particular context is measured with three, seven-point questions.  The purchase context is not explicitly stated in the items and must be stated elsewhere.

How much a customer believes that a particular product is not worth the price being charged is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that he/she can successfully cope with unexpected financial situations.

How much a person prefers not to make decisions related to a certain domain is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

With four items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that his/her decisions involving a particular domain of information are made well and easy to make. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures how much a consumer feels that he/she has devoted money, emotion, and other psychological resources to an object.

The extent to which a person believes he/she has what it takes to make wise financial decisions, especially with respect to investments, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale has five, five-point items that measure a person’s belief that he/she is not only financially secure at the time-being but will be financially secure for the long-term.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that thinking about his/her discretionary purchases would result in various negative feelings. 

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is unsure about how a company’s stock will perform.