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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

financial

Three, seven-point items are used to assess the extent to which a consumer believes that the price of a particular product provides an accurate indication of its quality. The scale was called cue reliability by Darke and Chung (2005).

Three items are used to measure a consumer's estimate of a product's price.

A person's motivation to focus on potential gains rather than potential losses in selecting investment funds is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type statements.

These eight, seven-point Likert-type items are intended to measure a person's motivation to focus on minimizing risks and potential losses when selecting investment funds.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular university needs financial support from its alumni.

The scale is composed of three statements with a ten-point response format that measures a customer's attitude regarding the financial consequences of continuing/ending the relationship with a certain company.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that privacy and financial transactions are adequately protected by a particular website.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements and appears to measure the extent to which a consumer views the prices charged by a specific website for the products it carries to be reasonable. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) also used the scale with reference to a catalog.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type statements measuring how a person compares his/her family's standard of living (financial well-being, status, happiness) compared to the typical people shown on television, with the emphasis being on families shown in commercials.

The scale is composed of four statements that attempt to assess the utility derived from the perceived economic value of a particular product. One way the scale is distinguished from that of a satisfaction scale is that it could be applied at various stages during the purchase decision process whereas satisfaction is usually measured after the decision.