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fitness

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure a food’s healthiness in terms of its effectiveness.  To be clear, the emphasis in this particular measure is not on the nutritiousness of the food but rather how well it helps one to stay physically fit.

The scale uses three statements and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the extent to which something has helped a person want to exercise regularly. The motivating factor in the study by Nan (2008) was a public service announcement. However, the items seem to be amenable for use with other stimuli.

This scale uses six, five point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a recent experience at a resort/spa solved some health-related problems (physical, emotional, mental).

The six-item, seven-point scale is used to measure quality-related beliefs a person has regarding an exercise and fitness service (health club).

Eleven, seven-point items are used to measure the level of satisfaction a consumer has with a health club, with a particular focus on its equipment and employees.

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's expressed level of personal involvement in sports activities, not just being a spectator. It was referred to as sports enthusiast by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and physical fitness by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).