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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

food

Three, seven-point semantic differential items measure the degree to which a person believes a particular food is an important part of a healthy diet.

How much a person describes his/herself as being careful to eat in a nutritious manner is measured with three, eleven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s negative attitude regarding large food systems (producers and retailers) and the desire to avoid buying from them.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that buying locally produced foods helps the community and it is important to him/her to support that.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that some particular produce (vegetables or fruit) is not normal and has something wrong with it, with an emphasis on how it looks. 

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person’s attitude about some produce (vegetables and/or fruit) in a particular context is harmful to eat and could make him/her sick.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s belief that locally produced foods taste better and are more nutritious than those produced elsewhere.

Five, five-point items measure a person’s belief that, with respect to heterosexual couples, one gender tends to dominate food-related decisions while the other is more dependent.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a consumer’s belief that a particular food product featured in an advertisement is likely to have genetically modified ingredients. (GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organisms.)