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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

food

A person’s attitude about food made from safe-to-eat ingredients that would otherwise be wasted is measured with ten, seven-point semantic differentials.

The extent to which a person believes that it is risky to eat a particular food is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

How vividly a person believes he/she can imagine food products being associated with physical waste is measured with three, seven-point items.  The items make the most sense if the participants have read something about food products that contain ingredients that are safe to be eaten but are otherwise going to be discarded.

The degree of pleasure and enjoyment experienced when eating a particular food is measured with three, seven-point semantic-differentials.

How much a person believes that the color of a particular food is consistent is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

The extent to which a person believes the shape of a particular food is uniform rather than varying is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

Using three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures the perceived uniformity of a particular food’s texture.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials were used to measure how much a person mentally links a certain product with physical waste.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a group of restaurants are premium quality due to the high quality of the food as well as the prices charged.

The belief that one’s body can easily digest the foods he/she eats is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.