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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

food

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a consumer’s belief that a particular food product featured in an advertisement is likely to have genetically modified ingredients. (GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organisms.)

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure a food’s healthiness in terms of its effectiveness.  To be clear, the emphasis in this particular measure is not on the nutritiousness of the food but rather how well it helps one to stay physically fit.

The degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between the healthiness of food and its cost such that healthier foods tend to be more expensive than unhealthy foods is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person anticipates that if a particular meal is eaten then he/she would feel bad and sorry about it afterwards.  A three- and a four-item version are discussed.  Each item has its own unique semantic differential and a 101-point sliding scale.

The degree to which a person believes a particular food is wholesome and healthy is measured with three questions, each with its own semantic differential and a 101-point sliding response scale.

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a particular food is good to eat and is not fattening.

Five semantic differentials compose the scale and measure facets of a food product’s quality and taste.

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.

The belief that a particular portion of food is sufficient for satisfying one’s appetite in a particular context or for part of a meal is measured with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point items to measure a person’s belief that a particular portion of food is a sufficient quantity for enjoying the taste of a specified food.