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friendly

How much a person views him/herself as sympathetic and concerned about others is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person describes him/herself as talkative and gregarious.

How much a person is sociable and talkative is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure whether a customer has more of a communal relationship or an exchange relationship with a business or employee.  In the scale, a communal relationship is informal and like a family whereas an exchange relationship is formal and purely transactional.

How kind and friendly something appears to be is measured with seven-point items.  A five- and a three-item version are described.  The scale is flexible for use with people, animals, and objects.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

Using a Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks that relevant others believe customers ought to be friendly to employees, especially to those at stores who provide service.  Items for both a four-item and a two-item version are described.

How much a customer believes that other people would approve if he/her acted unfriendly to a particular employee is measured by the scale.  The scale is useful when it is assumed that the actions of an employee could motivate customers to be unfriendly.  Items for both an eight-item and a five-item version are described.

This Likert scale measures the degree to which a customer of a store believes an employee was unfriendly based upon several verbal and non-verbal behaviors observed during a visit.  Items for both a nine-item and a three-item version are described.

The scale measures how common a person believes it is in a certain setting for people to behave in ways that are unfriendly.  The scale was made for use in a situation where customers interact with service employees.  However, the items appear like they could be used with minimal changes in many other contexts as long as people are interacting with others using verbal and non-verbal means to express unfriendliness.  Items for both an eleven-item and a seven-item version are described.