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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

friends

The importance a person places on his/her affective and behavioral involvement with close others is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s intention to recommend something to others such as a service provider, retailer, website, or brand.

How much a person likes another person and would like to interact with him/her more is measured with eight, ten-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person expresses a willingness to be friendly and develop a relationship with a particular person is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to establish a relationship and communicate with a particular person on Twitter.  The scale may make most sense to use when the specified person is a celebrity.

The scale uses five, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that those close to him/her promote equality by helping the less fortunate.

The adequacy of help and emotional support one receives from others is measured in this seven-point Likert-type scale.

A customer's likelihood of expressing criticism of a store and urging others not to shop there is measured with three items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure the level of positive conversation a person is aware of regarding a particular brand.  Although one item refers to media coverage, the emphasis in two of the items is specifically about what friends are saying.

This five item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures one's lack of friends who can provide a sense of belonging as well as understanding and help.