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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

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The scale is composed of three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a person feels that there is not enough time available to perform a specific task. In the study by Suri and Monroe (2003), the scale was used with subjects who had been asked to evaluate some product-related information in a certain period of time.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes it is not worth it to change from one thing to another, such as changing service providers or brands. The switch examined by Meuter et al. (2005) had to do with a new method of ordering prescription refills. The authors referred to the scale as inertia.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements that measure the type of perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have to do with the time and effort needed to develop the knowledge and skills needed to interact effectively with a new service provider and its products.

Seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a customer's thoughts regarding the degree of costs (time, money, and effort) that would be associated with changing service providers. Ganesh, Arnold, and Reynolds (2000) referred to their scale as a measure of dependence.

This semantic differential scale measures a consumer's degree of satisfaction with something specific rather than his/her overall level of contentment in life. The scale may be most suited for measuring a consumer's satisfaction with another party with whom a transaction has occurred or with whom a relationship has developed.

The scale has been used to study salespeople (Oliver and Swan 1989a; Reynolds and Beatty 1999a, 1999b), hairstylists (Price and Arnould 1999; Bansal, Taylor, and James 2005), banks (Jones, Mothersbaugh, and Beatty 2000), and auto repair facilities (Bansal, Irving, and Taylor 2004; Bansal, Taylor, and James 2005; Thomas, Vitell, Gilbert, and Rose 2002).

The scale uses semantic differentials to measure a consumer's degree of satisfaction with some stimulus. The scale has been used with regard to: insurance agents, service policies, insurance agencies (Crosby and Stephens 1987); shopping (Eroglu and Machleit 1990); a retail store and an airline (Nijssen et al. 2003; Sirdeshmukh, Singh, and Sabol 2002); and, a camcorder (Spreng, MacKenzie, and Olshavsky 1996).

The scale is composed of three questions that are intended to measure the amount of difficulty a person has had in stating reasons for a behavior or decision he/she has made.

Three, seven-point statements are used to measure how easily a person completed a task in which he/she was supposed to provide reasons for doing something. In Tybout et al. (2005), subjects were asked to give potential reasons for driving a particular car.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a good or service is free from effort when being used. Meuter et al. (2005) referred to this scale as complexity because they were studying the five key characteristics thought to influence adoption of innovations (Rogers 2003).

The scale is composed of three statements that are intended to measure a person's belief that a particular website is free from technical glitches as far as the customer's experience is concerned such as busy server messages or crashing.