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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

frustration

The scale has four, seven-point uni-polar items that are used to measure the extent to which a person experiences negative affect after exposure to some stimulus.

Seven, nine-point unipolar items are used to measure one's positive emotional reaction to a certain advertisement.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree of disagreement and frustration that a client states having with his/her representative(s) at the company's advertising agency.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements and measures an aspect of service quality involving the degree to which a customer thinks the time required for patrons to receive service is acceptable and that the provider cares about it.

A consumer's degree of satisfaction with some stimulus is measured with the various versions of this scale.  The scale has been applied to insurance agents, a service policy, and an insurance agency (Crosby and Stephens 1987); shopping (Eroglu and Machleit 1990); and a camcorder (Spreng, MacKenzie, and Olshavsky 1996).

A three-item, six-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a person describes feeling a sense of anger and possibly hatred on exposure to some stimulus. Phrasing of the scale was such that it measured the respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than the attitude toward the stimulus itself.

Three one-word items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer feels that the wait he or she has experienced in a service encounter has been frustrating.

This is a four-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring a person's perceived inability to influence the political system. This scale was referred to as political efficacy by Durand and Lambert (1985).

A four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's dislike of housekeeping. A two-item version of the scale was used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) as well as Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).