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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

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The scale measures a person's evaluation of an ad's distinctiveness. Homer (1995) used four, nine-point semantic differentials while Homer (2006) used six semantic-differentials with an unknown number of points on the response scale.

The extent to which a person believes an advertisement is arousing and pleasant is measured in this scale with three items.

This Likert-type scale is intended to measure the degree to which a commercial one has seen was considered to be fun and exciting. Some of the users referred to it as stimulation while others called it entertainment.

The scale is composed of six, five-point semantic differentials assessing a person's stereotypic beliefs about people who consume alcohol.

This scale uses three unipolar terms with a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the degree to which a person feels that, in general, the advertising in a specific country is pleasing and entertaining.

The extent to which a consumer expresses a tendency to shop for the arousal and excitement it brings is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person views him/herself as funny, thinks that others view him/her as funny, and desires to interact with sources (people, stories) that are funny.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person uses the Internet because of the enjoyment received from it and its usefulness in having a good time.

The extent to which a person views shopping at a specific website as helping provide a sense of leaving his/her normal world for a while is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type statements. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) used the scale with reference to a catalog while Mathwick and Rigdon (2004) used it with reference to searching a website for information.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure how entertaining a person believes a website to be. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) also used the scale with reference to a catalog.