You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

fun

The scale measures a person's evaluation of an ad's distinctiveness. Homer (1995) used four, nine-point semantic differentials while Homer (2006) used six semantic-differentials with an unknown number of points on the response scale.

This Likert-type scale is intended to measure the degree to which a commercial one has seen was considered to be fun and exciting. Some of the users referred to it as stimulation while others called it entertainment.

The extent to which a person believes an advertisement is arousing and pleasant is measured in this scale with three items.

This scale uses three unipolar terms with a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the degree to which a person feels that, in general, the advertising in a specific country is pleasing and entertaining.

The extent to which a consumer expresses a tendency to shop for the arousal and excitement it brings is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person views him/herself as funny, thinks that others view him/her as funny, and desires to interact with sources (people, stories) that are funny.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person uses the Internet because of the enjoyment received from it and its usefulness in having a good time.

The extent to which a person views shopping at a specific website as helping provide a sense of leaving his/her normal world for a while is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type statements. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) used the scale with reference to a catalog while Mathwick and Rigdon (2004) used it with reference to searching a website for information.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure how entertaining a person believes a website to be. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) also used the scale with reference to a catalog.

This scale uses four statements to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that the website for a particular store that he/she has just visited is fun and visually appealing. Even though the scale was developed for use with webstore, the items appear to be amenable for use with a brick-and-mortar store as well.