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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

games

A person's opinion of a particular game is measured in this scale with six, seven-point, bi-polar adjectives.

The level of intensity and activity a person reports feeling while playing a particular game is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person expresses enjoyment with respect to playing a particular game is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's intention to play a particular game in the future if there is an opportunity is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The level of violence a person believes there is in a particular video game is measured using four, five-point items.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the assumption is that the respondent has actually played the game rather than having merely heard about it in some way.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person's subjective knowledge of platforms used to play video games.  It does not attempt to measure knowledge of games played on the devices.

A person's enjoyment in playing a particular game and desire to play it again is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person plays video games and loves doing so is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

Four Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product that is advertised within a video game is related in some way to the nature of the game. The items in the current version of the scale were developed for use with a racing game and will need to be modified somewhat for use with other types of games.

It is a six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a consumer's enjoyment of contests/sweepstakes and tendency to buy products associated with such games. This measures a general interest rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995; Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer 1997) referred the scale as contest/sweepstakes proneness and Burton et al. (1998) called it contest proneness.