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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

government

A person’s intentions to not only complain directly to the company but also to news media and multiple levels of government is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Six statements are used in this scale to measure a person's belief that companies should not send jobs to other countries and it is the government's responsibility to make sure it does not happen.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that government agencies and officials are benevolent and honest with respect to the way a specified activity is regulated. Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008) referred to this measure as system trust-government.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes that laws in one's country and internationally are sufficient to protect consumers' online privacy.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that government agencies in the U.S. have clear policies regarding the production of biotech crops. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as rule-based trust.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's belief that companies producing biotech crops are concerned about and committed to following U.S. government regulations. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as intent.

The extent to which a person believes that there is a need for government regulation of programming (including commercials) aimed at children is measured by nine, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point statements intended to assess the importance a person places on maintaining a positive image in the community when it comes to deciding whether or not to air an advertisement. As studied by Wicks and Abernethy (2001), the respondent was a TV sales manager or other station employee who was familiar with the station's clearance policy. Further, the type of advertisement they examined was infomercials.

Sixteen, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's attitude about a wide range of ecological issues with an emphasis on conservation and pollution. The developers of the scale referred to it as Environmental Concern (Weigel and Weigel 1978).

A four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's belief about the ability and/or desire of government to handle what one perceives to be important matters. This scale was referred to as political trust by Durand and Lambert (1985).