You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

grocery

A consumer’s expressed likelihood of buying four different categories of organic foods is measured with four, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer enjoyed the experience of shopping at a particular store, website, mall, etc. is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items. 

Using nine, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's tendency to place greater importance on low prices rather than high quality when shopping, particularly with respect to groceries.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's desire to save time when shopping for groceries.

This is a three-item, five-point scale apparently measuring a shopper's attitude about the product quality associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This three-item, five-point scale is used to measure a shopper's attitude about the prices associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This scale is a three-item, seven-point, Likert-type measure assessing a consumer's tendency to purchase just what he/she needs regardless of whether or not products are on sale. The scale was referred to as marginal utility by Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1990)

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer holds a positive attitude about shopping such that it is enjoyable and worth the time and effort.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure a person's attitude regarding the quality of a particular product/brand.

It is a three-item, seven-point scale measuring the self-reported likelihood that a consumer will purchase a product based upon information he/she has read either on the product's package (in the case of something purchased in a supermarket) or on the menu (in the case of purchasing something a restaurant).