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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

grocery

A consumer’s expressed likelihood of buying four different categories of organic foods is measured with four, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer enjoyed the experience of shopping at a particular store, website, mall, etc. is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items. 

Using nine, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's tendency to place greater importance on low prices rather than high quality when shopping, particularly with respect to groceries.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's desire to save time when shopping for groceries.

This is a three-item, five-point scale apparently measuring a shopper's attitude about the product quality associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This three-item, five-point scale is used to measure a shopper's attitude about the prices associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This scale is a three-item, seven-point, Likert-type measure assessing a consumer's tendency to purchase just what he/she needs regardless of whether or not products are on sale. The scale was referred to as marginal utility by Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1990)

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer holds a positive attitude about shopping such that it is enjoyable and worth the time and effort.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure a person's attitude regarding the quality of a particular product/brand.

It is a three-item, seven-point scale measuring the self-reported likelihood that a consumer will purchase a product based upon information he/she has read either on the product's package (in the case of something purchased in a supermarket) or on the menu (in the case of purchasing something a restaurant).