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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

groups

How much a person views a particular social group as important and central to his/her self-image is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point items. 

Three, eleven-point items measure the extent to which a person believes that a situation or experience affected him/her in such a way as to feel closer to an individual or a group.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s motivation to help groups to which he/she belongs be successful regardless if he/she receives attention for contributing or is liked by group members.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a person’s unease and displeasure that a group he/she belongs to is inferior to other such groups and is not performing as well.  The criteria on which the groups are being compared are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire. 

The scale measures a person’s eagerness for his/her group to compete against other such groups and win.  The way the groups would compete and how superiority would be judged are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire.  Six, seven-point items compose the scale.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way a reference group of his/hers looks to others, particularly with respect to the area where the group members live.  

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person has a sense of responsibility for helping a group of which he/she is a member perform an activity or achieve a goal.  

With seven, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she is liked by others and part of a group (unspecified).

The extent to which a person feels connected to and part of a specified group of people is measured with twelve, seven-point Likert-type items.

Nine, seven-point items are used to measure how close one feels to a particular person and how likely the person would fit in one’s “in-group.”