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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

happiness

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

The degree to which a person has an emotional response to a stimulus which results from feelings of surprise and joy is measured with five, seven-point items.

How much a consumer likes and uses a product is measured with three, seven-point items.  Unlike most other measures of product attitude, this one makes most sense to use with people after they have bought a product and used it.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

A person’s belief that he/she has the necessary financial resources to not only pay bills but also feel relatively wealthy is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person likes natural environments and enjoys spending time in them.

How a person reports feeling (affectively) is measured with six, nine-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s beliefs about the level of materialism of one of his/her parents.  (The scale is completed twice if assessment of both parents’ materialism is of interest.)

The degree to which a customer is glad about a decision he/she made and believes that it was the right decision is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This three item scale measures the degree to which a person thinks a product is characterized by happiness that was implanted in it by the production process.