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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

happiness

How much a person reports feeling happy and content as opposed to sad and depressed at a particular point in time is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items. 

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s expectation that if a particular refund was received, he/she would feel good.

The degree to which a person derives pleasure from the suffering that someone or something else has experienced due to his/her actions is measured with seven items.

The four item, seven-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person wants to make some decisions in such a way as to make someone happy and indicate how much their relationship is valued.

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

The degree to which a person has an emotional response to a stimulus which results from feelings of surprise and joy is measured with five, seven-point items.

How much a consumer likes and uses a product is measured with three, seven-point items.  Unlike most other measures of product attitude, this one makes most sense to use with people after they have bought a product and used it.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

A person’s belief that he/she has the necessary financial resources to not only pay bills but also feel relatively wealthy is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person likes natural environments and enjoys spending time in them.