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health

The scale has 27 seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which one believes that heath outcomes are controllable. Internals are those who believe outcomes are based upon their own behavior whereas externals think that outcomes depend more on luck, fate, or other people.

A six-item, seven-point summated rating scale is used to measure the frequency with which one contacts professionals in the health care industry for information about health-related issues.

A 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of control one believes he/she has over his/her health-related behaviors. The emphasis is on engaging in the behaviors rather than the outcome of those behaviors.

A five-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the frequency with which one uses media and other nonpersonal sources for gathering information about health-related issues.

A four-item, seven-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person describes his/her reason for donating blood as being self-motivated.

A six-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the frequency with which a person engages in several activities related to healthy nutrition. The scale was referred to by Moorman and Matulich (1993) as negative diet restriction because the emphasis of these items is on what to limit in one's diet rather than which good foods to consume.

Five, seven-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a specified brand of shampoo has certain characteristics.

A four-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure how a person feels about attempting to lose weight during the upcoming week.

The three-item, seven-point scale attempts to assess a person's stated likelihood of getting a diagnostic blood test in the future.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that companies should noticeably position warning-related information in print ads rather than burying it where it is less likely to be seen. The scale was referred to as responsible advertising by Torres, Sierra, and Heiser (2007).