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hedonic

The scale is composed of six, seven-point bi-polar adjectives intended to measure the extent to which a person perceives a stimulus to be aesthetically pleasing with the emphasis on its visual aspects.

The scale assesses the degree to which a person believes that the number and quality of a person's possessions are necessary to achieve happiness in life. The original version of the scale was composed of five, five-point Likert-type statements. Alternative versions of the scale, varying in their length, were subsequently developed and tested by Richins (2004).

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent that a consumer expresses pleasure in buying and owning a brand. The scale was labeled as the Hedonic dimension of the CIP (see Origin below) by Voss, Spangenberg, and Grohmann (2003).

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the extent to which a person views the situation in which a product is normally used to be either more pleasure-related (hedonic) in nature or more functional (utilitarian).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the portion of a person's attitude resulting from sensations derived from experience or the sensations one imagines would be experienced. The scale is amenable for use with product categories or more specifically with brands.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's description of an emotional reaction to some stimulus with an emphasis on the most intense pleasurable feelings, e.g., delight, ecstasy. The product examined by subjects in the Shiv and Nowlis (2004) study was ice cream while the focal stimulus used by Nowlis and Shiv (2005) was chocolate.

The scale is composed of three semantic differential items measuring one's affective response to some stimulus.

A three-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer views a purchase decision as being influenced by his or her feelings, versus cognitive thought processes, because of such things as ego gratification, social acceptance, or hedonic motivation.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure a person's attitude about a product with an emphasis on its hedonic aspects. Although the scale looks like an attitude measure, it has been used a measure of one form of involvement.

A three-item, six-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a person describes feeling a sense of victory and/or patriotism upon exposure to some stimulus (e.g., music). Phrasing of the scale was such that it measured a respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than attitude toward the stimulus itself.