You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

home

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that everyone could experience a house fire and, if it occurs, smoke detectors can reduce the damage.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items which measure a consumer’s objections to having a product installed on his/her house.  The objections have to do with the effort involved with the installation process and making the product fit the house’s existing structure.  

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the degree to which a consumer believes that a computer has changed key aspects of his/her life, particularly in the home.

It is a three-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the one's attitude about direct marketing activities being aimed at him/her.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which an apartment featured in an ad is viewed as being of high quality.

Three, five-point Likert-type items that appear to measure the value a person places on being a homemaker. The scale measures not only whether the respondent views herself/himself as a homemaker but also the importance of that role in general.

Five, seven-point items measure the degree to which a consumer believes that having home-cooked meals and eating together as a family is important.

This is a four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale assessing a person's enjoyment of and interest in cooking. It appears to be the scale used by Dickerson and Gentry (1983) called culinary enthusiast. It may also be similar to the scale called attitude toward cooking used by Burnett and Bush (1986).

This five-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's desire to minimize the time spent on common activities and was referred to as time spent in everyday activities by Dickerson and Gentry (1983).