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honesty

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes some entity is honest and not manipulative.  The focus of the measure is commonly a person, but the scale is general enough to be used with other entities such as a company, an ad, or a website. 

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

A person’s general level of trust across a variety of people and situations is measured with 25, five-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure one’s trust of a particular person or those playing a specific role but rather the tendency to trust others and be optimistic about their intentions.

Using four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the honesty and ethicality of something.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears that it can be applied to a particular person or a group of people.  While it might be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of non-human entities (ads, organizations), it seems most suited for people.

The degree to which a person has negative beliefs about advertising in general is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a person's belief that a company really cares about people and is honest with its customers.

The veracity of the promotion about a brand is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items.

A customer's level of trust in a particular salesperson is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items. 

A consumer's belief that a brand is dependable and has integrity is measured with eleven, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person views an advertisement as being truthful, impartial, and persuasive is measured with six, seven-point, uni-polar items.