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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

ideas

How much a consumer indicates that the purpose of a particular shopping trip was to look for new ideas and products is measured with three, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

The five-item Likert-scale measures a motivational state in which a customer’s imagination is stimulated by an evocative external stimulus.  In a consumer context, the inspiration is assumed to come from marketing activity although it is not stated in the items themselves.

How much a person experienced something that inspired him/her to do something is measured with four, seven-point items.  As phrased, this scale is general and could be applied in a wide variety of contexts where the focus is on a temporary state a person has experienced rather than an enduring trait.

With three, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer’s expressed probability of providing ideas and feedback to a particular business entity in the future.

The scale uses seven, five-point items to measure the willingness and tendency of a member of a customer ideation group to create product ideas by integrating and combining his/her own thoughts with those of others in the group.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular program provided him/her with new ideas and other information is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person's belief that a particular company utilizes people in the product design process who are not completely free to produce new ideas but, instead, must conform to company rules and conventions.  There were two slightly different versions of the scale, one referring to "company designers" and the other referring to "users."

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's belief that a particular company gathers new product ideas from a group of people who are dissimilar in various ways and generate ideas that are diverse as well.