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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

importance

How much a person believes that a particular recommendation provided important and helpful information is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Since the recommendation is not identified in the items themselves, the scale appears to be suitable for a wide variety of situations.

With four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree of concern a person has about tipping at a particular service-related retail establishment.  The scale is flexible for use in a variety of contexts in which tipping is relevant. 

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular task he/she engaged in strengthened what was personally important in life. 

How much a person feels his/her life is important and that he/she is essential to others is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.

Using three Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person is involved in a particular hobby and identifies with it, e.g., driving, baking, fishing.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how well one person knows a particular person and believes their relationship is important.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how important and fun shopping is to a person, in general.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

How much a person views a particular social group as important and central to his/her self-image is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point items. 

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person is sensitive about the way companies handle personal information because he/she believes privacy is very important.