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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

importance

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how well one person knows a particular person and believes their relationship is important.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how important and fun shopping is to a person, in general.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

How much a person views a particular social group as important and central to his/her self-image is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point items. 

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person is sensitive about the way companies handle personal information because he/she believes privacy is very important.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement addressed concerns about a product that was important to him/her.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how important a product feature is to a consumer’s evaluation of a particular product and the decision about it.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between self and a particular party (person, group, or company) and that he/she values it.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person places so much importance on the brand that his/her decisions within a particular product category are limited to the just the preferred brands.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s beliefs about the level of materialism of one of his/her parents.  (The scale is completed twice if assessment of both parents’ materialism is of interest.)