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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

importance

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's opinion about the extent to which usage of a certain website has an effect on one's prestige in a reference group.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on mass media advertising when shopping for a specified product.

This is a seven-point, four-item semantic differential scale that is supposed to measure a person's intrinsic involvement with a particular advertisement.

This is a four-item, five-point that measures the importance a person places on independent, expert information sources.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of importance that various information sources, mainly in-store influences, have to a person when shopping for a certain product.

This five-item, seven-point scale is used to measure various aspects (knowledge, use, importance) of a consumer's involvement with several product categories.

A five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the importance placed on the influence of friends in the consumption of certain expressive products.

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the importance a consumer places on the influence of others in the consumption of certain expressive products.

This scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the importance placed on the influence of one's best friend in the consumption of certain expressive products.

The various versions of this Likert-type scale are used to measure the importance of being in fashion, particularly with regard to dress. A four-item version was suggested by Wells and Tigert (1971) and apparently used by Darden and Perreault (1976). Two-and four-item versions were used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and Wilkes (1992), respectively. See also the scale used by Schnaars and Schiffman (1984).