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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

information

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The degree to which a person believes a particular website has interactive features which allow him/her to customize information is measured in this Likert scale with three, five-point items.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

Four items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports focusing only on product-related information in a task and ignoring other information.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude about the adequacy of the information provided at a particular website to meet his/her needs.

The degree of control one has over the personal information possessed by a company is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a customer trusts that an online retailer is protecting his/her personal information is measured using three, five-point items.

The degree to which a person expresses confidence in his/her ability to find information about a product in order to make a decision is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While this scale might be used with sources other than online, it seems to be most suited for that context.