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information

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

How much a person believes that a particular recommendation provided important and helpful information is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Since the recommendation is not identified in the items themselves, the scale appears to be suitable for a wide variety of situations.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes the review of an experience written by someone else is specific in its details rather than general.

Three, ten-point items measure how much a consumer wants more detailed information about something because of the information’s usefulness.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The degree to which a person believes a particular website has interactive features which allow him/her to customize information is measured in this Likert scale with three, five-point items.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

Four items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports focusing only on product-related information in a task and ignoring other information.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.