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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

information

How much a person believes that a particular recommendation provided important and helpful information is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Since the recommendation is not identified in the items themselves, the scale appears to be suitable for a wide variety of situations.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes the review of an experience written by someone else is specific in its details rather than general.

Three, ten-point items measure how much a consumer wants more detailed information about something because of the information’s usefulness.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The degree to which a person believes a particular website has interactive features which allow him/her to customize information is measured in this Likert scale with three, five-point items.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

Four items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports focusing only on product-related information in a task and ignoring other information.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude about the adequacy of the information provided at a particular website to meet his/her needs.