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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

innovative

A person's tendency to learn about and adopt innovations (new products) within a specific domain of interest is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is intended to be distinct from a generalized personality trait at one extreme and a highly specific, single product purchase at the other extreme.

How new and surprising a product development process is believed to be is measured using four, seven-point items.  The statements composing the scale are flexible enough to be used when comparing two products or when assessing just one product, but the response formats would need to be different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

The degree to which a consumer has a favorable attitude about installing a particular product is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.  The product as well as the place and timing of installation can be customized for a variety of situations.  However, it should be understood that this is not a measure of purchase intention per se but is an antecedent of it.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the leadership of a particular company's chief executive office, particularly as it pertains to managing the development of innovative products. 

A person's description of his/her level of innovativeness and originality is measured with three, five-point uni-polar items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure the degree to which a person views himself/herself as being creative.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure how fresh and original a product is believed to be.  The scale seems to be flexible for use with a wide variety of products and other objects.

The degree to which a person views a certain brand as being a leader and innovative is measured in this scale with three, nine-point unipolar items.

The degree to which a consumer believes that a company is able to develop new and useful products is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.