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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

intelligence

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how smart a person is subjectively judged to be.  The emphasis is on learning and grades, thus, is most suited for use with students.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by a personality-type factor having to do with productivity and intelligence.

Four, eight-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's assessment of a new product inventor's intelligence and competency.

The scale has five, seven-point statements intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to communicate and interact with the user in a natural, human manner.

This scale uses four, seven-point statements to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product reacts to changes in its environment in a stimulus/response manner but without learning to improve its performance over time.

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to operate in an independent and goal-directed manner without intervention by the user.

The degree to which a person believes that a product exhibits the properties of a human-like personality is measured with four, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes that a product is able to communicate with other devices to achieve a common goal is measured by this scale using four, seven-point items.

The motivation for a person's behavior that may have involved misrepresenting the truth is measured in this scale with four statements. In particular, the motivation represented in the items has to do with the desire to appear to others as a consumer who has made a good decision by getting a good deal though the reality is that too much was paid for a product. The scale was referred to as public self-threat by Argo, White, and Dahl (2006).