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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

intensity

The degree to which a person believes that a particular health issue is serious and important is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the visual clarity and intensity of a particular advertisement.

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used to measure how visually well-defined and vivid a stimulus appears to be.

How graphic and intense a stimulus is perceived to be is measured in this scale with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses four uni-polar items with a five-point Likert-type response format to measure how devastating and distressing a situation seems to be.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of brand competition in the market, with an emphasis on the fierceness of the advertising among a set of brands.

Three, seven-point items measure a consumer's annoyance with the quantity of times a company has contacted him/her.  Although written with respect to e-mail messages, the items appear to be flexible for use with several other forms of contact such as phone calls, text messages, advertisements, and paper mail.

How much a person plays video games and loves doing so is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

Four items are used in this scale to measure the extent of the negative affective reaction a customer experienced after a service failure.  The emphasis is on the affective aspect of the response (what the person felt) rather than behavioral (what the person wanted to do).

This 17-item, seven-point scale measures the degree and ease with which a person reports images coming to mind while processing some specific stimulus as well as the intensity of those images. Burns, Biwas, and Bibin (1993) referred to the measure as vividness.