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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

intention

A person’s stated likelihood of traveling to a particular place is measured with four, eleven-point items.

The degree to which a person states that he/she is likely to consume alcohol in the next year is measured with three, five-point items.

A person’s expressed likelihood of giving money to a particular charity is measured using three, seven-point items.  Donating money is explicitly mentioned in the items but contributing other material or non-material resources are not mentioned.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

The six, seven-point items in this scale measure a person’s expressed likelihood of engaging in behaviors related to saving money in the near future.  Four of the items are rather general but two are specific about ways to get more information to help save money.

A consumer’s stated probability of buying a particular product on a shopping trip in the next month is measured with three, seven-point items.  What makes this scale different from other measures of purchase likelihood is that this one refers to a specific time period and assumes the shopper has read some information on the package.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure a person’s stated likelihood of sharing good information about a brand to others he/she knows.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

Leaving an area within a store or the store itself without buying the product of interest is measured with six, seven-point semantic differentials.  Two versions of the scale are described. Temporary abandonment has to do with the shopper's intention to return later in the shopping trip to make the purchase while Permanent Abandonment means the shopper does not plan to return to buy the product.