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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

interaction

With three items, this scale measures a consumer’s belief that a brand expresses interest in being part of one’s life.

This three-item scale measures the belief that a brand is attempting to build a sense of closeness between itself and the consumer (the respondent).

The Likert scale has eight, five-point items that measure how much a person has had an experience in a virtual environment which allowed interaction with a simulated representation of a product.

The degree to which a person believes a particular website has interactive features which allow him/her to customize information is measured in this Likert scale with three, five-point items.

The extent to which a person would actively avoid interacting with others if he/she were in a certain physical environment is measured with three, seven-point items. 

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures the importance a person places on having friendly interactions with other participants of an online discussion thread.

Composed of three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular website, most likely an online retailer, provides ways for customers to reach them and even speak with a live representative if desired.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a customer feels some control over the interaction with a salesperson by actively participating in a discussion of goods and/or services appropriate for his/her needs.

The scale uses three, ten-point questions to measure the degree to which a person thought about how he/she looked compared to a particular person with whom he/she interacted.