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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

interaction

The scale uses three statements to measure the degree to which a consumer likes Internet shopping sites to facilitate the connection of shoppers so they can share ideas and help each other.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

How much a person views the interaction that occurred between him/herself and another person as being competitive and businesslike is measured using four, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure a person's positive reaction to another person's nonverbal expression of emotion.

A person's negative reaction to the nonverbal expression of emotion by another person is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The tendency for a person's emotions to be adjusted, possibly subconsciously, to match those of another person is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, five-point items that are used to measure how much a consumer likes to interact with other shoppers in second-hand stores.

A six-item, seven-point summated rating scale is used to measure the frequency with which one contacts professionals in the health care industry for information about health-related issues.

A six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just gone through an experience with other people describes feeling closer to them because of the events and activities they shared. Arnould and Price (1993) referred to the construct measured as communitas.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer prefers a personalized shopping experience rather than self-service stores where there is little personal interaction between salespeople and cus tomers. The scale was referred to by Forman and Sriram (1991) as attitude toward perceived depersonalization (APD).

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree of control a person reports having over his/her interaction with a particular website. The scale was referred to as the control subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to here as such.