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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

interaction

This scale is composed of six, seven-point items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that the speed with which a website reacts to user actions is fast.

The extent to which a communication event at a website is characterized by information other than in verbal form is measured using four, seven-point items.

The extent to which a response to a communication event at a website was perceived to be immediate or without delay is measured with four, seven-point items.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree of control a person reports having over his/her interaction with a particular website. The scale was referred to as the control subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to here as such.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point items that are used to measure the degree to which the information provided in an interaction event at a website, such as clicking on something, is perceived to be appropriate and relevant.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which communication with a website is perceived to be reciprocal or to allow mutual action.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a website enables the user to know where he/she is, go where he/she wants to go, and do what he/she wants to accomplish at the site.

Six, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person believes a website allows a free flow of information from the user as well as to the user (two-way).

Five, seven-point items are used to describe how "social" an object is. While the scale appears to be amenable for use with reference to a person, it was made for use with a website, thus, it may make most sense when used with non-human objects that are intended to have human-like qualities such as interactivity and protocol usage.

This is a three item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person is motivated to observe and interact with other people when shopping.