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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

interaction

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is to get benefits from them in return for benefits given to them (quid pro quo).

The scale has nine, seven-point items that are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is due to such things as a genuine concern for their needs and/or to please them.

The scale measures the degree to which a customer believes the relationship he/she has with an employee is warm and pleasant.  A four- and a six-item version are described.

The degree to which a customer of a business expresses comfort and enjoyment interacting with a particular employee is measured using this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a group of people he/she has interacted with listened to and were open to his/her ideas. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

The scale has five, seven-point statements intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to communicate and interact with the user in a natural, human manner.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure how a person feels after socializing with other people. In other words, to what degree does a person feel good (wanting more socialization) or bad (wanting less)?

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community expends effort to help others in the group. Mathwick, Wiertz, and Ruyter (2008) referred to the scale as norms of voluntarism.

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a customer who has interacted with a company's employees believes that they treated him/her well. The scale was made to be used in a situation where a customer has complained to a company about a problem.