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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

interaction

This is a three item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person is motivated to observe and interact with other people when shopping.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a person engages in behaviors to manage the quantity and quality of information exchanged in conversations with others. The scale was called information control by Mittal, Huppertz, and Khare (2008).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a group of people who he/she has interacted with made him/her feel like they all had something in common. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of interactivity a person believes there to be in a particular computerized interface such as the type used in self-service contexts for monetary transactions, self-help, or customer service.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person expresses an awareness of self as a social object with an effect on others.

The scale has nine, seven-point items that are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is due to such things as a genuine concern for their needs and/or to please them.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is to get benefits from them in return for benefits given to them (quid pro quo).

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a group of people he/she has interacted with listened to and were open to his/her ideas. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

The scale measures the degree to which a customer believes the relationship he/she has with an employee is warm and pleasant.  A four- and a six-item version are described.

The degree to which a customer of a business expresses comfort and enjoyment interacting with a particular employee is measured using this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.