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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

interaction

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a person engages in behaviors to manage the quantity and quality of information exchanged in conversations with others. The scale was called information control by Mittal, Huppertz, and Khare (2008).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a group of people who he/she has interacted with made him/her feel like they all had something in common. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of interactivity a person believes there to be in a particular computerized interface such as the type used in self-service contexts for monetary transactions, self-help, or customer service.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person expresses an awareness of self as a social object with an effect on others.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is to get benefits from them in return for benefits given to them (quid pro quo).

The scale has nine, seven-point items that are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for interacting with others is due to such things as a genuine concern for their needs and/or to please them.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a group of people he/she has interacted with listened to and were open to his/her ideas. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

The scale measures the degree to which a customer believes the relationship he/she has with an employee is warm and pleasant.  A four- and a six-item version are described.

The degree to which a customer of a business expresses comfort and enjoyment interacting with a particular employee is measured using this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.

The scale has five, seven-point statements intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to communicate and interact with the user in a natural, human manner.