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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

interaction

The scale has five, seven-point statements intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is able to communicate and interact with the user in a natural, human manner.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure how a person feels after socializing with other people. In other words, to what degree does a person feel good (wanting more socialization) or bad (wanting less)?

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community expends effort to help others in the group. Mathwick, Wiertz, and Ruyter (2008) referred to the scale as norms of voluntarism.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a customer who has interacted with a company's employees believes that they treated him/her well. The scale was made to be used in a situation where a customer has complained to a company about a problem.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a group of people who have been part of a conversation appeared to be engaged and interested. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

Three, seven-point statements are employed in this scale to measure a person's expectation that he/she would interact with a particular person. The other person could be someone real that respondents were familiar with or a hypothetical person described to them as part of the study.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the amount of control that a customer feels he/she has over a service that facilitates the gathering of information which is used for making a purchase decision.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that a particular website is personalized to meet his/her needs.

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale attempts to measure the degree to which a person believes that a website is interactive, with an emphasis on its capability to provide two-way flow of information and keep the user's attention.