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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

interaction

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure how a person feels after socializing with other people. In other words, to what degree does a person feel good (wanting more socialization) or bad (wanting less)?

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community expends effort to help others in the group. Mathwick, Wiertz, and Ruyter (2008) referred to the scale as norms of voluntarism.

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a customer who has interacted with a company's employees believes that they treated him/her well. The scale was made to be used in a situation where a customer has complained to a company about a problem.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a group of people who have been part of a conversation appeared to be engaged and interested. As used by Van Dolen, Dabholkar, and Ruyter (2007), respondents were evaluating a chat-based service they had experienced that was for gathering information about investment funds from other customers and a financial advisor.

Three, seven-point statements are employed in this scale to measure a person's expectation that he/she would interact with a particular person. The other person could be someone real that respondents were familiar with or a hypothetical person described to them as part of the study.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the amount of control that a customer feels he/she has over a service that facilitates the gathering of information which is used for making a purchase decision.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that a particular website is personalized to meet his/her needs.

A person's expectation that s/he would use a website in the future because of its features that enable communication with other people is measured with four, seven-point statements.

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale attempts to measure the degree to which a person believes that a website is interactive, with an emphasis on its capability to provide two-way flow of information and keep the user's attention.