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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

interaction

A person's expectation that s/he would use a website in the future because of its features that enable communication with other people is measured with four, seven-point statements.

The scale has four, seven-point statements that are suppose to measure how much a person would interact with a website in the future because of its content-related usefulness such as providing a search function, detailed information, and multimedia features.

The scale is composed of five Likert-type statements that are used to measure one's tendency to "speak up" when dealing with marketers (e.g., salespersons) by expressing concerns and desires. Bearden, Hardesty, and Rose (2001) referred to this scale as the marketplace interfaces dimension of consumer self-confidence.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure how positively a customer reports a recent "encounter" to have been. The encounter examined by Dolen et al. (2002) was between a customer and a salesperson in a retail store.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the importance a consumer places on interacting with a real employee (as opposed to a machine) when receiving service.

The four item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the degree to which a customer who lodged a complaint with a service provider thinks that the concern and effort put forth by employees to solve the problem was appropriate. In Smith, Bolton, and Wagner (1999; Smith and Bolton 2002), subjects were asked to imagine a visit to a service provider they had been to before and what they would do if a service failure occurred.

The degree to which a customer who lodged a complaint thinks that the resolution of the problem was appropriate is the subject of the scale. In the study by Tax, Brown, and Chandrashekaran (1998) the respondents were given this scale after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint. Similarly, in Smith, Bolton, and Wagner (1999; Smith and Bolton 2002) subjects were asked to imagine a visit to a service provider they had been to before and what they would do if a service failure occurred.

The scale is composed of nine, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the extent to which a customer reports being treated special by an employee and relating to each other on a personal level. The context examined by Dolen et al. (2002) involved a shopper and a salesperson in a retail store.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to assess a person's attitude regarding the degree to which a website has a "dynamic nature" enabling customers to search for, view, and compare products.

Five, four-point statements are used to measure how frequently a child says he/she talks with his/her mother about things shown on TV.