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interaction

The four, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree that a person indicates having influence over the outcome of a complaint compared to the other party (service provider) in a transaction. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The four, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree that a person reports that the other party in a transaction put a lot of effort into solving a problem. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The scale is intended to measure the degree to which a customer was able to easily lodge a complaint with the other party in a transaction. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.  The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items.

The measure is intended to capture the degree to which a person reports that the other party in a transaction gave an explanation for a problem that occurred with a service that was provided. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person uses the web because it provides an experience that is both exciting and manageable.

This scale is used to measure the degree to which a customer expresses intent to continue doing business with a particular service organization. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint. Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Twenty-four items in six subscales use a nine-point response format to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives that a particular salesperson engaged in behaviors that reflected sincere concern for the customer´s needs rather than just trying to make a sale.

Three Likert-type items measure the degree to which a customer is satisfied with the interaction he or she has had with a particular salesperson.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.

This seven-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a customer perceived a salesperson to have been friendly and helpful. Williams and Spiro (1985) viewed this scale as measuring the interaction-oriented dimension of customer communication style, which stresses enjoyment and maintenance of personal relationships to the possible extent of ignoring the task at hand.