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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

international

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that a company’s decision to bring its activities back into the home country is for the business-related benefits it expects to receive.

A consumer’s belief that a company’s decision to bring back its activities to the home country because of the benefits to the home country is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The likelihood that a person will engage in consumption behaviors over some period of time that are believed to benefit people in another country is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale has five semantic differentials and measures a person's opinion of whether it is damaging and unnecessary or beneficial and favorable for domestic companies to move business functions to other countries.

Three items are used to measure a person's belief that countries which are the recipients of jobs or other functions that have been moved from their original country (outsourced) are unfairly taking advantage of lower labor costs.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person's overall attitude toward a country as well as the products that are made there.

The severity of a country's need for help to alleviate a plight or other unfortunate condition is measured in the scale with four statements.  Because one of the items contains the term "unjust," the scale is most appropriate for use in contexts where the problem is man-made, e.g., social injustice.

Four, seven-point uni-polar items compose the scale and are intended to measure a consumer's overall opinion of the products that are manufactured in a particular country.

How easily a person is able to convert an amount of money in an unfamiliar currency to an equivalent amount in a familiar currency is measured in this scale using four, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three items compose this scale which measures a person's belief that he/she can help others by purchasing free trade products.