You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

Internet

How much a customer trusts that an online retailer is protecting his/her personal information is measured using three, five-point items.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular online retailer delivers exactly what customers have ordered.

How much a customer believes that a particular online retailer manages product returns and guarantees in an acceptable manner is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

Six semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer’s attitude about a retailer, with the emphasis on beliefs that could be considered most relevant when comparing online retailers.

The belief that a certain website is of high quality, particularly with respect to its design and content, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s concern about privacy when using the internet, with the emphasis on the misuse of information that has been submitted.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that a specific set or type of ads will be personally worthwhile and of interest.

A person’s level of trust in the benevolence, integrity, and competence of someone who has sent him/her a product-related message via e-mail is measured with nine, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person’s willingness to let a particular website track and analyze his/her navigation through the World Wide Web.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure one’s belief that it is fair for visitors to give something to a website in return for access to free content.