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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

Internet

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the ease with which a person reports being able to order and pay for products at a particular website.

This seven item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person views various online activities as potential threats to one's security and/or privacy, particularly when buying products.

The scale measures the the extent to which a person perceives that an advertisement has interfered with his/her processing of the non-advertising content of a medium, e.g., watching a TV program, surfing the web, reading articles in a magazine. Although the construct is theorized to lead to negative affective reactions (irritation) and behavioral responses (avoidance), it is viewed as distinct from them.

The scale has three items and is intended to measure a person's attitude about the way a particular website manages orders with the emphasis on issues relevant to customers, e.g., providing confirmation of orders, delivery options, and clear return policies.

Five, seven-point Likert type items are used to measure a customer's attitude regarding the extent to which a website has been responsive to problems and shown that it cares, particularly in the post-sales phase of the purchase process (billing, delivery, returns).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to measure a person's attitude about the extent to which a website tailors its products, promotion, and transactional environment to individual customers.

The three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the extent to which a person expects to use the Internet versus a physical store to gather prepurchase product information. Although the scale is based upon a respondent's answers with respect to three specific goods, in total they are intended to be representative of search goods in general (as opposed to experience goods). (See below for more detail.)

The degree to which a person expresses the intention to use the Internet versus a physical store to buy products is measured with three, seven-point items. Although the scale is based upon a respondent's answers with respect to three specific goods, in total they are intended to be representative of search goods in general (as opposed to experience goods). (See below for more detail.)

The five-item, five-point scale measures the likelihood that a person might use the web in the future to make reservations and/or purchase a wide range of products such as food, tickets, and clothes.